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05 December 2014

Reengining Works Great. What About Retrofits?

Author: Richard L. Aboulafia, Drawn From: World Military & Civil Aircraft Briefing

Reengining Works Great. What About Retrofits?

With the remarkable commercial success of Airbus's A320neo family, Boeing's 737 MAX series and Embraer's E2 70/110-seat jets, it's clear the market is very happy with reengined jetliners. These new products, and other reengined aircraft, have already racked up more than 6,000 new orders over the past three years.

07 November 2014

Aeronautical Innovations That Created Their Own Markets

Author: Richard L. Aboulafia, Drawn From: World Military & Civil Aircraft Briefing

Aeronautical Innovations That Created Their Own Markets

My job, my career, and indeed much of my non-family life revolve around inhabited aircraft. Not UAVs; other people cover that waterfront at Teal. And while I don't regard them as a threat to my beloved inhabited aircraft, I am kind of intrigued by UAVs. They represent a rare example of a technology that created its own market.

29 October 2014

Canada's Fighter Non-Decision Decision

Author: Richard L. Aboulafia, Drawn From: World Military & Civil Aircraft Briefing

Canada's Fighter Non-Decision Decision

In the words of Geddy Lee (of the progressive rock band Rush, if you didn't listen to FM radio in the '70s and '80s), "If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice." This certainly applies to the Canadian government's latest move with its long-awaited and controversial fighter buy. The government's decision to kick the country's next fighter purchase down the road actually guarantees the outcome the Harper government wants.

13 October 2014

Greatest Long-Term Threat to Boeing Is the Loss of Talent

Author: Richard L. Aboulafia, Drawn From: World Military & Civil Aircraft Briefing

Greatest Long-Term Threat to Boeing Is the Loss of Talent

Boeing recently decided to move the majority of its defense services and support work out of Seattle. The primary goal was to cut expenses; Seattle is a high-cost area, and the jobs will go to cheaper St. Louis and Oklahoma City. The move also reinforces Boeing's industrial footprint and political presence outside of Washington state. Boeing Defense, Space & Security (BDS) CEO Chris Chadwick termed the moves "necessary if we are going to differentiate ourselves from competitors and stay ahead of a rapidly changing global defense environment."

02 December 2014

Orion: Hard to Get All Tingly Over NASA's New Capsule

Author: Marco A. Cáceres, Drawn From: World Space Systems Briefing

Orion: Hard to Get All Tingly Over NASA's New Capsule

NASA is preparing to launch its new Orion capsule on Thursday, December 4. It will be the first test launch of the spacecraft, which is being billed as kind of a big deal because it represents the agency's first major step toward regaining an inhouse manned spaceflight capability -- something it has not had since the end of the Space Shuttle program in 2011.

30 October 2014

So What's Wrong With 40-Year Old Russian Engines?

Author: Marco A. Cáceres, Drawn From: World Space Systems Briefing

So What's Wrong With 40-Year Old Russian Engines?

The cause of Tuesday's Antares 130 launch failure is not known. The builder and owner of the rocket, Orbital ATK, will lead an investigation of the accident, and it will be assisted by NASA and the FAA. All that is known for sure at this point was tweeted by Orbital ATK: "There has been a vehicle anomaly. The vehicle suffered a catastrophic failure." Uh, yeah. That much seems painfully self-evident.

28 October 2014

Tens of Billions of Dollars for Asteroid Roping?

Author: Marco A. Cáceres, Drawn From: World Space Systems Briefing

Tens of Billions of Dollars for Asteroid Roping?

If you want a good example of what's wrong with the US space program, take a good look at the Space Launch System rocket NASA is developing. In 2011, NASA estimated the cost of developing this human-rated, heavy-lift vehicle, along with the Orion crew capsule and launch facility upgrades, at $18 billion through 2017. The latest estimate by NASA pegs the development cost for SLS/Orion at between $19 billion and $22 billion through 2021. Almost everyone in the space industry understands that this is an extremely disingenuous low-ball estimate.

10 October 2014

NASA's Commercial Crew Vehicles: Practical But Not Sexy

Author: Marco A. Cáceres, Drawn From: World Space Systems Briefing

NASA's Commercial Crew Vehicles: Practical But Not Sexy

The two Commercial Crew Transportation Capability (CCtCap) contracts awarded to Boeing and SpaceX by NASA on September 16 should come as no big surprise to anyone familiar with both the agency's conservative culture and its relatively small annual budget of just under $18 billion. Boeing received $4.2 billion to continue with development of its human-rated system based on the Atlas V rocket and CST-100 capsule, while SpaceX got $2.6 billion to continue work on its Falcon 9 v1.1 rocket and Dragon V2 combo.

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