Articles tagged with: NASA

05
April
2014

Sanctions Against Russia: Farcical Tantrums from US and EU?

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

Sanctions Against Russia: Farcical Tantrums from US and EU?

Since 2011, when NASA concluded its final Space Shuttle flight, the US has heavily relied on the rockets as a means of conveyance to the ISS. NASA forks out in the order of $70.7 million to the Russian space agency Rosaviakosmos per seat on a Soyuz capsule. All parties, notes Marco Cáceres of the Teal Group, are happy: Rosaviakosmos gets some cash and NASA gets to have its astronauts on a space station that cost the US tax payer $100 billion.

Media Outlet: News Junkie Post Tags Crimea | International Space Station | NASA | Rosaviakosmos | Russia | Sanctions

03
April
2014

NASA’s breakup with Russia is a manipulative money grab

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

NASA’s breakup with Russia is a manipulative money grab

“It’s dismaying that NASA officials would be directed to use this crisis to score domestic political points on behalf of the White House.” Marco Cáceres, senior analyst and director of space studies at Teal Group, is also perturbed. “It sounds like they are trying to use the crisis [in Crimea] as a way to increase NASA’s funding,” he says, “but it’s a disingenuous way of making the case, especially since there are a lot of other good reasons to increase NASA’s budget.” Currently, the agency’s budget is just under $18 billion — a level of funding that the agency has maintained more or less for the last six years. “NASA is extremely underfunded as it is,” Cáceres says. “Any recent increases have been barely enough to keep up with inflation.”

Cáceres says he is more concerned with NASA’s prediction that the agency will be able to launch from US soil as early as 2017. Even with a marked increase in NASA funding, he says, the likelihood of a US-based launch is minuscule because NASA doesn’t currently have access to a viable means of transportation to the ISS. “There really isn’t any great option in terms of a vehicle,” he says. “Even if you were to increase [NASA's] budget by 10 or 20 percent — maybe even 50 — you still wouldn’t have a good way of getting up there.” Cáceres says that although NASA is developing a heavy-lift rocket system called the Space Launch System, it won’t be ready for a crewed spaceflight before 2021.

Media Outlet: The Verge Tags Crimea | International Space Station | NASA | Rosaviakosmos | Russia | Sanctions | Ukraine

03
April
2014

Ponen en duda los motivos por los que la NASA rompió relaciones con Rusia

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

Ponen en duda los motivos por los que la NASA rompió relaciones con Rusia

“Resulta desalentador que los funcionarios de la NASA reciban indicaciones de utilizar esta crisis para ganar puntos políticos a nivel nacional en representación de la Casa Blanca”, dijo Marco Cáceres, analista y director de estudios espaciales de la consultora Teal Group.  Según Cáceres, “parece que están tratando de utilizar la crisis [en Crimea] como una manera de aumentar la financiación de la NASA”, lo cual, en su opinión, es una forma errónea de actuar.

Media Outlet: Russia Today Tags Crimea | NASA | Rosaviakosmos | Russia

23
February
2014

Government and industry work to cut the cost of reaching space

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

Government and industry work to cut the cost of reaching space

SpaceX’s prices are so low that they could upend the price structure the Air Force has used in sending military satellites into orbit. “What we do know is that if you look at a SpaceX heavy launcher like a Falcon 9 or a Falcon heavy, it’s at least 50 percent cheaper than a comparable vehicle by Boeing or Lockheed,” said Marco Caceres, senior analyst at the Teal Group Corp. in Fairfax, Va. “We’re talking at least $50 million cheaper per vehicle so it’s a significant cost saving for the Air Force.”

Media Outlet: San Bernadino County Sun Tags Air Force | Boeing | DARPA | Falcon 9 | Falcon Heavy | NASA | SpaceX

26
August
2012

Orbital Sciences readying for resupply mission to International Space Station

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

Orbital Sciences readying for resupply mission to International Space Station

Each mission is expected to take about a month; it takes about five days for the Cygnus to make it to the station, it will stay there for anywhere from two weeks to two months, and it will take another day or two for the spacecraft to disintegrate on reentry. "The idea of now relying on private industry and let[ting] them lead the way has already been decided," said Marco A. Caceres, director of space studies at the Teal Group. "The question is: Can industry do it without too many failures?" He said Orbital's success, along with that of SpaceX, which has already made it to the space station, would provide the needed competition and potentially open the door to more companies. "There's a lot at stake here because you're really talking about the future of human spaceflight. It's not going to be NASA that does it," said Caceres. "It's these companies ... that are supposedly going to be colonizing the moon and maybe even Mars."

Media Outlet: The Washington Post Tags Cygnus | International Space Station | NASA | Orbital Sciences

30
June
2006

Questions orbit around future of NASA

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

Questions orbit around future of NASA

As the federal deficit grows, it may be difficult to find the $104 billion it will cost to send Americans back to the moon, say Launius and Marco Caceres of the Teal Group, an aerospace analysis firm. Caceres warns NASA’s competing priorities may have consequences, especially if corners are cut. The nation “is giving NASA all this difficult, visionary stuff to do but … not giving them the resources to do it,” he says. “Eventually it catches up with you and you have an accident.”

Media Outlet: USA Today Tags NASA

06
February
2003

NASA contractors draw scrutiny

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

NASA contractors draw scrutiny

NASA took steps to shore up its most glaring weaknesses, ending its downsizing plan and hiring some new staffers to fill the biggest gaps. But not everyone believes the agency has come close to recovering its prior strength, and a GAO report released just three days before the Columbia mishap said the problems were persisting. At first blush, it seems obvious that safety “has got to suffer because they have fewer people,” said Marco Caceres, senior space analyst at the Teal Group, an aerospace research firm. “I’m not sure it’s as simple as that, but in hindsight, with this tragedy, that’s one of the first things you’re going to look at.”

Media Outlet: Chicago Tribune Tags NASA | Space Shuttle Columbia

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