Teal Group In The Media

Our analysts are sought out by the business community and by the media for their independent insights and forecasts.

16
May
2013

Drones: Coming (maybe) soon to skies near you

Featuring: Philip Finnegan

Drones: Coming (maybe) soon to skies near you

Yet while this is an industry waiting to take off, until the Federal Aviation Administration sorts out the rules of the air for unmanned vehicles it will remain idling on the runway, because for now commercial flights are banned. Congress has asked the FAA to write regulations governing civil operation of small unmanned aircraft systems in the national airspace by 2015. It’s not clear whether the agency will meet that deadline or not. “There’s just too much uncertainty,” said Phil Finnegan, director of corporate analysis at the Teal Group, which monitors the aerospace industry. “There will be applications when the FAA opens up the airspace. The first one will be law enforcement, then civilian. But for now, they cannot fly freely in airspace.”

Media Outlet: CBS News Tags Drones | FAA

18
March
2013

The Race to Cash in on Earth Orbit

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

The Race to Cash in on Earth Orbit

“The two companies I think are extremely well-positioned for the future are Arianespace and SpaceX,” says Marco Caceres, an aerospace analyst with the Teal Group. “They are the ones who are the most diversified and have the best pricing.” SpaceX offers $160 million launches, about $100 million less than those of Arianespace and ULA.

Media Outlet: Popular Mechanics Tags Arianespace | SpaceX

07
March
2013

FAA Likely to OK Boeing Battery Testing in Days

Featuring: Richard L. Aboulafia

FAA Likely to OK Boeing Battery Testing in Days

Boeing said on Monday it can move “really fast” to get the Dreamliner back into the skies once the FAA approves the fix. But the FAA faces unusually tough obstacles in approving it for flight – one of them brought on by the agency’s own boss. LaHood promised early in the crisis that the Dreamliner would not resume flying until regulators were “1,000 percent sure” of its safety. As no aircraft is 100 percent safe “it is going to be a challenge for the FAA to dial back from some of the overheated rhetoric,” said Richard Aboulafia, an aerospace analyst at the Teal Group in Virginia. Aboulafia estimated it would take at least four months for the 787 to be cleared to fly if the FAA approves flight tests soon. If flight testing approval takes longer, it could take 6-9 months before the 787 is back in the air.

Media Outlet: CNBC Tags 787 Dreamliner

14
February
2013

Drone Tests Must Adhere to Privacy Rules, U.S. FAA Says

Featuring: Steven J. Zaloga

Drone Tests Must Adhere to Privacy Rules, U.S. FAA Says

Chris Calabrese, legislative counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union, called the FAA's announcement a good first step. "It's a smart start to this to use the test phase to also test what works best to protect privacy," he said. The U.S. still needs to regulate drone use by law enforcement, Calabrese said. The global market for drones will grow to $11.4 billion in 2022 from $6.6 billion this year, according to Teal Group Corp. of Fairfax, Virginia, which analyzes the industry. Major drone makers include Northrop Grumman Corp., General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc., and Aerovironment Inc., which make most sales to the U.S. military, said Steve Zaloga, a Teal Group analyst.

Media Outlet: Bloomberg News Tags Drones

04
February
2013

REQUIEM FOR A DREAMLINER?

Featuring: Richard L. Aboulafia

REQUIEM FOR A DREAMLINER?

To understand why, you need to go back to 1997, when Boeing merged with McDonnell Douglas. Technically, Boeing bought McDonnell Douglas. But, as Richard Aboulafia, a noted industry analyst with the Teal Group, told me, "McDonnell Douglas in effect acquired Boeing with Boeing's money." McDonnell Douglas executives became key players in the new company, and the McDonnell Douglas culture, averse to risk and obsessed with cost-cutting, weakened Boeing's historical commitment to making big investments in new products. Aboulafia says, "After the merger, there was a real battle over the future of the company, between the engineers and the finance and sales guys." The nerds may have been running the show in Silicon Valley, but at Boeing they were increasingly marginalized by the bean counters.

Media Outlet: The New Yorker Tags 787 Dreamliner

16
January
2013

NASA Goes Ikea to Test Inflatable Annex for Space Station

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

NASA Goes Ikea to Test Inflatable Annex for Space Station

It will rocket into space in 2015 with the blessing of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, which last week awarded the firm a $17.8 million contract to demonstrate the technology. Eventually, Las Vegas hotelier Robert Bigelow wants to build separate stations that might be used as research laboratories orbiting Earth or to establish a permanent presence on the moon or Mars. "Ultimately, he's hoping to build hotels in low-earth orbit and have that be one of the up-and-coming space businesses — this will give him more credibility," said Marco Caceres, a senior space analyst with Teal Group Corp. in Fairfax, Virginia. "There's a lot of people out there that say, 'Oh c'mon, hotels in low-earth orbit — that's a fantasy right?' I believe he has the tools to do it." The challenge will be finding customers, Caceres said in a phone interview. Bigelow's primary focus is on corporations and governments interested in developing astronaut programs or doing research. Space tourism is secondary, and the company has tried to steer away from the space hotel label.

Media Outlet: Bloomberg News Tags Bigelow Aerospace | International Space Station | Space Tourism

08
January
2013

Dreamliner glitches giving Boeing a black eye

Featuring: Richard L. Aboulafia

Dreamliner glitches giving Boeing a black eye

Electrical problems and fuel leaks have plagued the new Boeing plane model recently. On Monday, an empty Japan Airlines 787 in Boston caught fire. On Tuesday, a fuel leak forced a different Japan Airlines 787 to cancel takeoff and return to the gate before ultimately completing its trip to Tokyo. "We're getting to a tipping point, where they go from needing to rectify problems to doing major damage control to the image of the company and the plane," said Richard Aboulafia, a defense and aerospace analyst with Teal Group, a consulting firm based in Fairfax, Va. "While they delivered a large and unexpected number of 787s last year, it's possible that they should have instead focused on identifying glitches and flaws, rather than pushing ahead with volume production."

Media Outlet: Chicago Tribune Tags 787 Dreamliner | Boeing

26
August
2012

Orbital Sciences readying for resupply mission to International Space Station

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

Orbital Sciences readying for resupply mission to International Space Station

Each mission is expected to take about a month; it takes about five days for the Cygnus to make it to the station, it will stay there for anywhere from two weeks to two months, and it will take another day or two for the spacecraft to disintegrate on reentry. "The idea of now relying on private industry and let[ting] them lead the way has already been decided," said Marco A. Caceres, director of space studies at the Teal Group. "The question is: Can industry do it without too many failures?" He said Orbital's success, along with that of SpaceX, which has already made it to the space station, would provide the needed competition and potentially open the door to more companies. "There's a lot at stake here because you're really talking about the future of human spaceflight. It's not going to be NASA that does it," said Caceres. "It's these companies ... that are supposedly going to be colonizing the moon and maybe even Mars."

Media Outlet: The Washington Post Tags Cygnus | International Space Station | NASA | Orbital Sciences

13
April
2012

Satellites to China Fuel Dispute Between Thales, U.S.

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

Satellites to China Fuel Dispute Between Thales, U.S.

The State Department is pursuing "all available options," including administrative penalties, to compel Thales Alenia Space to disclose any U.S.-made parts in eight communications satellites it sold to China, Assistant Secretary for Legislative Affairs David Adams told Congress. The department's options include withholding licenses the company needs as prime contractor on a $3 billion program to build 81 satellites for Iridium Communications Inc. (IRDM), according to Marco Caceres, a military and civilian space analyst. He said that could postpone Iridium's plans to launch the first of the new satellites in 36 months and possibly force the company to find a U.S. contractor to take over the program. "If they delay it by six months, Iridium needs to do it sooner rather than later," Caceres of the Fairfax, Virginia- based Teal Group, said in an interview.

Media Outlet: Bloomberg News Tags China | Iridium | Technology Exports

06
February
2012

DOD Should Weigh Reforms for Small Contractors: Panel

Featuring: Joel Johnson

DOD Should Weigh Reforms for Small Contractors: Panel

A pair of government contracting experts told the U.S. House of Representatives' Armed Services Committee on Monday that without reforms, small companies will have an increasingly difficult time doing business with the Pentagon as its budget shrinks.
Joel Johnson, director of the defense consulting firm Teal Group Corp., and Allan Burman, president of the contractor Jefferson Solutions, told the committee that the U.S. Department of Defense would benefit by creating new incentives for small business contracts.

Johnson and Burman testified before the committee as part of an ongoing set of hearings called "Doing Business with the DOD." It is the second hearing this year that has touched on contracting obstacles for small businesses.

According to Johnson, shrinking research and development budgets will cause major contractors to stop subcontracting with smaller counterparts, likely forcing small businesses to make painful workplace reductions.

"Smaller companies currently not doing defense work will be skeptical that this is an area to pursue, particularly if the civil economy is beginning to show signs of life," Johnson said. "This makes it all the more important that the government is not seen by potential innovators in the private sector as being an unattractive customer, partner or investor."

 

Media Outlet: Law360 Tags Defense Budget | Defense Contractors

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